Case Study - Air Handling Unit Retrofit

Posted: 6/5/2013

When a fully-staffed office decided they needed a new air handling unit without disrupting business, they called F.E. Moran Mechanical Services for their ability to think outside the box to solve unique issues.

Commercial Facility with Unusual Layout

A Lombard, IL commercial building plagued with high energy bills chose to upgrade to a high efficiency air handling unit on the fourth, sixth, and seventh floors of the high-rise building. The problem: the mechanical room was in the center of an office filled with employees on the sixth and seventh floors. With the need to upgrade the system, but without disrupting business, this commercial business chose F.E. Moran Mechanical Services as the lead contractor to coordinate the difficult task.

Numerous Hurdles Conquered over Holiday Weekend

Due to the location of the mechanical rooms, this project was certain to have obstacles. The first, F.E. Moran had to install a new air handling unit in the center of two occupied floors without disrupting business or disturbing the facility. To solve this problem, the installation was scheduled over the Thanksgiving holiday, to avoid disturbing employees. However, this tight timeline posed its own difficulties. The F.E. Moran Mechanical Services crew now had to tightly coordinate the installation and all sub-contractors scheduled work to ensure all work was complete before employees arrived Monday morning.

The dismantling of the old air handling system posed a new problem. The old air handling unitredesigning mechanical room was built in 1982. It was so large it needed to be dismantled piece by piece to remove it, and the mechanical room needed to be re-structured. The original air handling unit was obtrusive, providing only a foot of space for service personnel to work. Additionally, a vestibule was inside the already small mechanical room, and needed to be taken down without disturbing employees or blemishing the building.

The final hurtle was moving the new air handling unit onto the sixth and seventh floors without disturbing the building. With the issue of moving a large air handling unit and an additional problem of only having passenger elevators to move it in, the team needed to think outside of the box.

Learn how this project ended - click here.
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